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CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 10:00pm EST
to the border and then some dumb son of a bitch will shoot at us than i can shoot back. of so we did and they just waved. [laughter] now over 1300 miles notice the road, they drove every night and i noted the ammunition. the other problem with afghanistan is called pakistan 1500 miles that extends here to miami. now understand the essence of what we are doing. we went in 2001 because the taliban supported al qaeda who had killed 3,000 americans at the world trade center's we went in to get the seven guns but what happened? in my judgment several things happened. president bush, a god bless him, had a religious belief in liberty four people and i think he confuse that with his role of president and took that and extracted it to say we should give liberty to the iraqis and afghans which is a noble idea but if you are a president sometimes you have to be hard-headed how you apply an idea into action and we were not able to do with sell when they said who will do this idea? they said if we have the united states military. so we took counterinsurgency a subject i know all lot about be
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 3:00pm EST
at 9 a.m. thanks for being with us. more booktv ahead. >> you're watching booktv on c-span2. here's our prime time lineup for tonight beginning at 7 p.m. eastern. republican senator scott brown of massachusetts on his personal and professional life, including his election to the u.s. senate to fill the term of the late senator ted kennedy. at 8, richard whitmire examines former washington, d.c. school chance michelle rhee's efforts to reform the school system. on after words, rubin carter talks about the 20 years he spent in prison and his work for the innocence since his 1935 re-- 1985 release. we conclude with mr. west who served as assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs durgd reagan administration. he argues that a reliance on counterinsurgency strategies has led the u.s. astray in afghanistan. >> in this time we win, senior editorial writer robbins argues that the tet offense offensive was a failure for the vietnamese. from san diego, this is about an hour. >> thanks, t.j.. good morning, everybody. happy to be here. thanks for inviting me. i'm really d
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 9:00am EDT
who are the top five nuclear powers, they are, of course, us, russia, china, france, and the united kingdom. pakistan is close to surpassing the united kingdom, and it's on a trajectory that will make it the fourth largest nuclear power in the world. and pakistan is the host to more terrorist groups than any other nation in the world. per square kilometer, you can't find more terrorists than in pakistan with the possible exception of the gaza strip. and pakistan has an extraordinarily complex relationship. on the one hand, it has been the patron of many of these terrorist groups. the group that attacked mumbai in 2008 is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the isi. and yet it is at war with others, the pakistan taliban, and it is an extremely violent war. last year there were over 2,000 terrorist attacks in pakistan, somewhere near 10,000 pakistanis died or were wounded. so how did we get here? well, that's the subject that i try to address in "the deadly embrace." and i try to do it by looking at three narratives and see how they interconnect with each other. the first narrative is pakist
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 1:00pm EST
got things all checked off but during the day, please consider joining us and supporting the tucson festival of books to keep this amazing event here in tucson. thank you for being here and for your support and if you want to follow us out, i am going to head to the dining area. .. >> the other groups were, you know, i did think that the existence of a small, but very powerful elite was something new, and so i call that the group, and then there's a category to deal with other griewps who didn't -- groups who didn't fit the category like immigrants, for example from caribbean and africa, and also biracial americans. i thought they would fit into an umbrella group called the emergence. that's how i got that. >> i noticed you put new immigrants and biracial people together, and you're comfortable with that, grouping them under the same umbrella? >> well, i was mostly comfortable with that. it was not precise, and it didn't make for as clean of a category as the other category. however, i thought that the similarities were, the concept of emergence, groups that were becoming more promi
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 5:15pm EDT
those of you who don't walk around with a cheat sheet, who are the top five, us, russia, china, france, and the united ud kingdom. pakistan is close to surprising the united kingdom and on the trajectory to be the 4th largest. it's the host to more terrorists groups than any other nation. per square kilometer, you can't find more terrorists with the possible exception of the gaza strip. pakistan has an extraordinary complex relationship. on the one hand, it's been the patron of many of the terrorists groups, the group that attacked mumbai in 2008, it was a subsidiary, and yet it is at war with others, the pakistan and taliban. it's an extremely violent war. last year there were over 2,000 terrorists attacks in pakistan. nearly 10,000 pakistanis died or were wounded. how did we get here? that's the subject that i try to address in the deadly embrace. i try to do it by looking at three narratives and see how they interconnect with each other. the first narrative is pakistan's own internal. the second is the u.s. pakistani bilateral relationship, and the third is the rise in globa
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 9:30am EDT
keeplers.com. >> is there a nonfiction author or book you'd like to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv@cspan.org or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. >> up next on booktv a program that originally aired live on booktv.org. three former high-level pentagon insiders take a critical look at how the defense department operates. thomas christie, franklin spinney and pierre sprey are all contributors to the book "the pentagon labyrinth." this is about an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good evening. thanks for being with us tonight. i'm drew, the executive vice president for the world security institute. the institute is the nonprofit organization that's home to our center for defense information and our strauss military reform project whose latest work "the pentagon labyrinth: ten short's essays to help you through it," is the reason we've gathered here tonight. the goal of the project is to transform u.s. national security to meet the missions and threats of today. and it believes that it's essential that we consider both the fiscal and the strategic implications of de
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 11:00am EST
really old. .. >> guest: they are deluded. >> host: use it to overwhelming problems of old, old age our health and working overtime which is inevitable and the tendency for most people to get more. you suggest there's collective action that we should take in response to that. what are those points. >> guest: health there's not much we can do about it. there are people whose health doesn't constantly worsen over time. but i think those of us who have parents who have survived into the '90s and grandparents as i have, know that the typical person has to deal with many more health problems over time. and this by the way, the province of the oldest old have to be looked at as not entirely but they are huge women's issues because right now the vast majority of people over 85 are women there and everybody gets for overtime except people like warren buffett. i'm sure he's going to be well fixed at 92. but women in particular get poor because there are lots of things that happen to total income with the death of a husband. this is true of women today, most of them didn't work outside the home.
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 8:00am EDT
because it's a reminder for us, all of us including us, doctors, we need to be humble about what can and can't be cheated. so this was the background again, these missing stories, a word that can't be uttered, a word that is whispered about. the big c. and again, the question was what were the stories. and one thread became very early on is that any that somewhere in this story would have to be the story of one of the most remarkable women in recent intellectual history, and that is mary lasker. mary lasker who, among many other things, directed her philanthropic energies. she was a very unusual woman for her times, and out of a number, -- and entrepreneur, a one who directed an enormous amount of energy to solving, as she put it, transforming the geography of american health, the landscape of american health. and if there was one sort of central characters think to the story it would be mary lasker. and for mary lasker then, it very quickly, i found sidney farber who begins the book. said the farmer was mary lasker's friend. scientific collaborator, and is mary lasker a political li
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 8:00pm EDT
bookstore, a landmark since 1953 in the city of fries. we're delighted to have john with us here tonight. he teaches history at georgia state university in atlanta and taught at harvard in history and literature and the underwriting program. he's the founding editor of the 60s, a journal's history of politics and culture, and he'll discuss "smoking typewriters," published by oxford university press. it examines the question of how the new left uprising of the 60s emerged and with the dramatic events of the middle east and our own uprisings here in wisconsin it's a timely way to examine the role of new media in insurrection from the l.a. free press all the way through the revolution and the advent of chat books and the culture through media is explored and offers insight into the contemporary movements of social change. please join us in welcoming >> john. [applause] >> thank you. it's happy to see familiar faces and old friends. i've never managed to live in san fransisco, but i've visited several times. it's nice to be here in this capacity. i appreciate it. you know, originally my plan
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 8:00pm EST
use to convince ourselves of things that appear not to be true and actually are. that, little did i know at the time exactly how much that was to bite off. this was a project that initially started as a hopeful magazine story, and i couldn't interest any magazine editors in writing it. that's less rare than you think. you can't sell a magazine article, but you can get somebody to write a book. that strikes me as -- we don't want to read 5,000 words, but 130,000 words, great. [laughter] but i ended up writing -- this is a little bit less than half of what i ended up writing which is good. it definitely should not have been the length it was, but i'm just saying that as an illustration of the ways in which i felt like this one issue permeated through other things we're dealing with as a society and as a culture. it's also the reason why neither the word autism nor vaccines appears in the title which i had some spirited debates with my publisher who kept saying i believe books should say what they're about, and i kept saying, realm, it's not just about that, and we don't want to give p
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 7:00pm EST
need to do more. but enough to get us up and running and it's been a great sponsorship. >> david stewart is the president of the washington independent review of books. washington independent review of books.com is the website. .. >>> republican senator scott brown of massachusetts recounts his personal and professional life which includes his tenure in the massachusetts state senate and his election to the u.s. senate on january 19th, 2010, filling the term of the late senator ted kennedy. senator brown spoke of the ronald reagan presidential library in simi valley, california. [applause] >> well, before i get started i just want to say i had an opportunity to go around and try to meet everybody and say hello, and i know you talk about the weather here, no offense. [laughter] snow as high as the flags. i did get a chance to tour this facility and be part of history. it's a wonderful opportunity for not just young people but every person from every walk of life and i am so honored to be here. i want to thank you all for the very warm welcome and john, i appreciate kind introducti
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 7:00am EDT
beautiful march 12, 2011. and a special welcome to folks all over the world who are joining us on c-span's booktv. my name's jay rochlin, and i have the pleasure of welcoming you to the panel, dispatches from the borderlands, human rights, personal stories. i will also in a moment have the honor of introducing our wonderful authors who will make up this panel. first, i'd like to thank the organizers of the tucson festival of books, all the the sponsors and, in particular, university medical center for sponsoring this venue.sori we've got an hour for our discussion, and here's how it'sr going to work. i'm going to say just a few words to welcome and introduce our panelists. i've prepared some questions fos them just to get our discussiono going, and hopefully, you'llg have some questions, also, later on. i'll invite you to make your way up to one of the two to microphones, one here, one there, where you'll have a chance to askmi about what's, maybe, on your mind. right after our discussion, the authors will go to the signing area and set up in the maddenn media signing area number on
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 9:00pm EDT
we would have accepted anything, any terms, but he gave us hope of the white man's government and so we need to hold out. and so, i think will he played i think is the symbolic role of the president as leader that was important. if he hadn't so strenuously opposed voting rights, if he hadn't said it caused efforts to bring about land reform it's not to say that the south would have ruled over and would have -- but when you have the enemy down, you know, when you've got them down when, that's when you impose the terms and move forward and numerous people said he had actions embolden them that could be recalcitrant, could sort of top-down any move so it wouldn't have been the land of milk and honey. the south wouldn't have rolled over and accepted blacks as equals citizens but it wouldn't have been as bad as it was. and that lessening of the problem, any lesson of the oppression fighting would have made a big difference. so, yes, i have fought about it, and i do think that -- i think his particular brand of leadership was toxic, and it's important for us now to think about where we are
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 12:00am EST
angle. why is it that we as individuals create narratives that we use two combatants ourselves of things that appear not to be true, actually are. little did i know at the time exactly how much that was to bite off. this was a project that initially started as a hopeful magazine story and i couldn't interest any magazine editors into writing it. is actually less rare than you think. you can't sell a magazine article that you can get somebody to say they will write a book. we don't want to read 5000 words by 130,000 words, great. but i ended up writing. this is a little bit less than half of the book that i ended up writing, which is good. it definitely should not have been the link that was, but i'm just saying that as an illustration of the ways in which this one issue permeated through other things we are dealing with as a society and a culture. it is also the reason why neither the word autism nor vaccines appears in the title, which i had some spirit of debates with my publisher, who kept saying i believe you should see what they are about. i kept saying it is not just about t
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2011 7:00am EST
rhee kind of person considering what happened? and he said, you know, people like us, we are just so desperate to make a dent in some kind of improvement in the urban school districts. and so it is going to happen, they are going to start reaching out. he offered this avalanche of offers that came to michelle after she stepped out. so i think kevin is right. these reforms are going to be tried again and again, not just the michelle light version. so now i'll pass it to michelle who amazed me by agreeing to talk about her relations with the press, probably our least favorite topic, but considering this is organized by education writers association, she played along as a good sport. so over to you. >> my relations with the press. i think my relationship with the press was complicated. let me say on the first time that a lot of very good things happened because of the press attention that we got come with the efforts we are putting forth. i was really surprised to tell you the truth when i started a job that it was so much interest in what we were doing. i at first, you know, i would of
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 4:15pm EST
way i approach all of my books. i want to know every fact. every trivial fact. i may not use it but it gives me confidence that i know my subject and i may use it somewhere along the line. there was no library i visited, no archive or no research that was unexamined on my part. in addition to approaching this as a biographer/researcher, i was also an official witness and participant in bobby's career. i was the director of one of the first tournaments he ever played as a child in asbury park, new jersey at the monterey hotel that doesn't exist any more. on the boardwalk there. and bobby was 10 or 11 or whatever iwo's, and his mother was with him and i talked to bobby at that time but i noticed him. he was a magnet for people because he was so tiny. he was the youngest person in the tournament and everyone gathered around and watched him and i noted that he would become what he became. i noted how serious he was. he really took his time and concentrated. we also played in some of the same tournaments together over the years. we never met in an official tournament game. we were light
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 10:00am EST
comment, please, on colonial script, the currency used between the colonies at the time. finally, i believe it's article x specifically p demand withing the use of silver and specify being exactly what the monies for the nascent nation would be and, finally, the coin act of 1792 and the penalties thereof. thank you. >> guest: oh, you raise a very large, complicated issue. in the colonial period, the states did often issue paper money. look, they needed paper money. you needed a circulating medium, otherwise, you know, how do you, how do you have economic exchanges by barter? and you cannot have a specialized economy on the basis of barter. the difficulty was that sometimes the currency lost value, and the british ultimately said that they couldn't pass, that the states could not issue legal tender currency, and this is one of the big grievances. but in some states they held value, and they supported the economies quite well. later in the colonial period, after independence, pardon me, this became an issue again. i mean, the states issued paper money, or they did not. and there was a
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 11:15am EDT
the other morning with a member of the board of trade who said he used to work for beverly's father. and i thought, of course, because, again, it's chicago, and everybody seems to have a connection to the business. i just thought i would say a few things about writing this book, and then i'm going to interview a trader because that seems much more fun than listening to me talk. so i'm -- first of all, why i wrote this book. i moved to chicago in 2004 for "forbes," and it just seemed that i seemed to meet a lot of traders everywhere i went. we rented an apartment to start in lincoln park and took up tennis which we played very badly, and ray conman, a big trader, played tennis on the next court regularly. then another time we went to the lake front, and i was reading a book about the dummy's guide to futures and options because it just seemed that it was a big local business, and i should learn more. and some guy came up to me and tapped me on the shoulder and was like, it's going to get eas. and i said, oh, that's good because i was reading about some -- i think it was a butterfly t
CSPAN
Mar 7, 2011 12:00am EST
: i heard people argue that they were inin trouble is a good sign of our democracy.y people use the word jealous part of that is not the word. did they are sensitive and reacted they did not just take it. they spoke up. >> host: pauline maier can you give us a snapshot of america in the 1775? >> guest: a snapshot is a very different place. they tend to think north or south thinking to the civil war. it is a much more complex place them back. there is a lot of differences within the new england states. talk about the middle colonieslo of new york, new jersey delaware and pennsylvania period divers with their population, and again farming, largely greens then what will further south of very different place now you have plantations rather than the family farms producing tobacco slaves? yes.la but they were not unique to this south the chesapeake to a little further and georgia and i left at north carolina but 40% of the population were slaves and you have that majority in south carolina but slavery was every where.... the remarkable part is that it was not much criticized. the real opp
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 6:00pm EDT
stream of the compassionate conservativism we hear today. they use a lot of the same ideas inhe welfare reform debate. but i wrote about libertarians, and i found, brian, it wasn't being covered in depth. it was fresh territory. and i think it is interesting. i think there is a lot of working press. there does tend to be a liberal bias. and certainly among liberal political people there is ignorance, frankly. they know far less about conservatives than conservatives know about them. i find it fresh territory. i kind it a hidden history of american politics. because the influence and rise to influence of this particular generation of conservatives has tremendously influenced the politicadebate. we look at everything from political muck raking to abortion politics to the budget battles of the 1990's, and these guys were very key in helping shape those debates. >> what kind of cooperation did you get out of the five. >> it varied. mostly given the fact i was from the, quote, establishment media, and there was probably some reason to distrust somebody coming from there, they were pretty coo
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 9:15pm EST
civil war. after that, communism. as the successful men turned old and frail, they watched us everything they had worked to achieve was crumbling. so here we are many many decades later, walking around china, reading about these boys, reading their writing in the question we asked ourselves when we wrote this book is, is there's a happy or a sad story? did the fortunate sons have a happy ending or a tragic one? and the more we thought about it, the more we realize that although they died 70 or 80 years ago, the story of the fortunate sons is not yet over. the lesson that they teach us, the challenges that they had to overcome are the challenges that still today we have to overcome. these are the challenges of america and china, having to learn how to speak to one another, not in the language of competition and conquest and mistrust but of cooperation and collaboration, a lesson by the way judging from president hu's visited the white house is increasingly well done. these are the lessons of chinese and americans understanding that china will never become america norwood america become ch
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 12:00pm EDT
winning historian who brings us a in a largely untold story in this newest work. the story of 60,000 men and women who remained loyal to the british empire at the conclusion of the american revolution. these loyalists decided to leave their homes and become refugees elsewhere in the british empire and all over the world. the boston globe calls "liberty's exiles" a masterful account and historian joseph j. ellis notes losers seldom get to write the history, but the american loyalists have at last count in their historian. the story is told with uncommon style and grace. an associate professor of history at harvard university. her first book what -- was awarded the 2005 dug cooper price and was a book of the year selection in the economist, guardian, and the sunday times. very pleased to bring her to a harvard book store this afternoon. please join me in a book coming maya jasanoff. [applause] >> thank you all for coming, and let me think harvard bookstore for hosting me. i've been coming to this bookstore since my undergraduate days a long time ago, and i feel like as my reading tastes ha
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 7:00pm EDT
, narrative gentry can be useful to all of this. obama. truth is the best corrective. ayers, the mind works in contradiction, and honesty requires the writer to reveal disputes with the self. notice with the self. obama, but i suspect we can't pretend the contradictions of the situation will exist can do is choose. ayers, the reader must see the struggle not by the tourist what wyatt program. obama, and all and all of an intellectual journey i imagine for myself complete with last point and strict itinerary. ayers, narrative raptors strive for signature but must be aware of the struggle for the honesty. obama, i was engaged in a imperial struggle. someone -- by the way, this is the only postmodern bouck obama route. it shows up and nothing else he ever wrote except dreams from my father. there's not a word in any of the articles otherwise. also at that point in the postmodern fling as well the grooves in which they had fallen and even the stitch together nature of their lives these are distinctive freezes, and the other thing i'm reading in the fugitive days is that after they dropped out o
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 7:00pm EDT
rebelling against misrepresentation and lower taxes, a claim familiar to us from revolutionary history. now, to give you a flavor of all of this, the book -- those are the big argumentings -- arguments in this book, but it's a narrative of individual figures. one of the i things i was concerned to do is recover the experiences of the people who are a neglected population in our his historical understanding. what i want to do is read to you portions of the book that explain the story of the first refugee who kind of drew me into this project, and she was a georgia loyalist called e elizabeth johnson, and she wrote a memoir i came across in research. i made a photocopy of it with me and this discover google books put it online in short order. that was extremely convenient. johnston wrote a memoir, and it weaves in and out in various ways. i want to give you a bit of a flavor of the book and her life and what remains. she was about 12 years old when the war began. her father was a well-off -- he was sort of a planter in georgia, reasonably well established on a plantation outside
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 3:00pm EST
working with beet sugar that was so useful, he became so rich, he bought his freedom. when we returned about that, we -- when we learned about that, we suddenly learned about a connection to marina's family. >> so i had always known about my family's connection to sugar because my great grandparents traveled from india across to guyana which is in south america, but it's considered part of the caribbean, and they came to cut, to work on sugar plantations. so part of what fascinated us was what is this substance where someone in be his family -- in his family all the way in russia, a serf, and someone in my family looking to get a better life over here in india and then over to the caribbean, what is this substance that could effect people from such different parking lots of the world? -- parts of the world? >> and before we trace that out, we want to ask you a question. how many of you think you might have sugar somewhere in your family background? so that's one, two, three -- oh, man, yes! yes! >> all right. what i'm going to do, i just want to hear from a couple of you where your fam
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 7:00pm EST
. .. >> part of the reason i wrote the book was to honor the men and women who won that war for us before the politicians threw it away. you frequently see tet in headlines these days. whenever anything bad happens in the world, terrorists do some kind of attack or insurgents have some kind of spectacular bombing or something, you'll see a pundit or a commentator say this is just like the tet offensive. iraq, afghanistan, wherever. i've saw, i saw a headline about tet referring to northern mexico, that some kind of tet offensive was going on there. "time" magazine said that the wikileaks document dump was just like the tet offensive. i don't quite see how you can make the analogy, but anyway, the point is that tet is out there. and the problem with this is that every time you say tet what you're really saying is defeat. what you're saying is that whatever we're involved in is like vietnam, it's a quagmire. we can't win and so forth. and, in fact, the bad guys out there, the terrorists and the insurgents, talk openly about the tet offensive and vietnam as their model. this is how they want
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 2:00pm EST
along the coast and cutting down forests. deforestation and other land-use accounts for a good chunk of greenhouse gas emissions on an average year. the interesting thing is even with all this destruction our natural systems are helping us out. our greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide specifically, the forests and oceans are taking up about half of what we are putting in the air on an average year. they are already on the job. that can give us a lesson about how much do we need to cut down? a simplistic look and a lot more detail on the background and preferences, those ideas of what we can do with this information. as i mentioned carbon dioxide and temperature tend to go up and down. some people might use that to wonder if it is natural and happens anyway why should we worry? i have a couple points. one is it may have been volcanoes emit in greenhouse gases in the mid cretaceous 100 years ago. looks like it might have been methane gas coming up from the ocean where we have trying to mine it simultaneously coming up spontaneously and creating problems, eating the environment and no
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 7:30am EST
have his purple heart that was donated by his son, mark vonnegut, to us. he received the purple heart for frostbite, and kurt vonnegut was embarrassed to have received the purple heart for frostbite when so many of his friends had, had suffered from other types of physical problems and disease. we have a fine first edition of the book "slaughterhouse five." this is important because "slaughterhouse five" is probably the most well known book written by kurt vonnegut of the 30-some piece of writing that he completed. this was possibly the most famous, excuse me, famous. >> why? >> why was "slaughterhouse five" famous? so vonnegut, let me give you a little bit of history about what happened to him in germany and my impressions of why it affected people so much. vonnegut, as i read, he was taken to this slaughterhouse. while he was in dresden, the allies bombed dresden, and so his own countrymen as well as allies bombed this city. it was a horrible bombing. it was literally a firestorm, and tens of thousands of people were killed. and these were noncombatants. these were women and c
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 8:00am EDT
. >> across the globe. in which we all decide to sit in some spot that appeals to us and just diluting. and yet on so many dimensions cities are healthier and more successful than ever. in the developed world, it was remarkable productivity. in per capita output level from the rest of the country rose to those out of new york our national gdp would increase by 43%. the three largest metropolitan areas in the u.s. produced 18% of our country's output while containing only 13% of our country's population. the connection between urbanization and economic prosperity is even stronger in the developing world. if you compare those countries with more than 50% of the population living in urban areas with those that have less than 50% of the population living in urban areas you will find more urbanized countries are more than five times more prosperous, five times richer. they also have infant mortality levels that are one-third as i. they also the people who describe themselves as being more satisfied with their lives and their jobs. cities are the path out of poverty into prosperity for so much of
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 9:00am EST
, six weeks, requires us all i think he rethink how we stand in the middle east. so tonight i'd like to talk about the three threats to the united states that emanate from the persian gulf. iran, saudi arabia, and what i call al qaeda -ism. in speaking tonight about the persian gulf, and the war against the islamist militancy emanating from there, i want to start with words george washington used to describe the new national governments responsibilities to ensure that americans clearly understand the threats they face at home and abroad. i am sure that the massive citizens of these united states meanwhile, washington told john j. in 1796. and i believe that they will always act will whenever they can update a right understanding of matters. let me say that i share washington's fate and he essentially sound common sense of american. except perhaps that of the coming generation whose male members seemed unable to figure out how to put a baseball cap on so the brim points forward. but i'm not saying saying that when a national government under either party is capable or even desirous of th
CSPAN
Mar 19, 2011 4:00pm EDT
the reason that i say that is because the first level of government to which any of us are subjected is not the government of the city, state, or federal government, it's the government of our own family. that's where we are governed first. and the fact is, it is that form of government that serves as the foundation for all of the other forms of government. i try to make, and i believe that i do make the case that this is not just a social issue as often has been described. sometimes there are people who want to create this to me artificial conflict between the designated social issues and the economic ones. the first chapter of the book, i believe, will make it very clear that there is a direct correlation between the fabric of our culture and the relationship of its families and the economy of a country. i want to begin before i even get into some of the figures by saying that i make it clear, this is not an attack on president obama. i believe we here a lot of talk about about civility. on any given day, you'll find politics that use any rhetoric possible. regarding going to the s
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Mar 20, 2011 2:45pm EDT
festival of the book for letting us have this panel, which my company is cosponsoring, and the virginia festival is the principal sponsor and brings a tremendous amount of wonderful things to the city every year. i thought it was appropriate to found my company here in charlottesville because of our local hero, thomas jefferson, who, of course, was very much in favor of both building international understanding of extending the range of what is permissible discourse about international affairs, and also doing so through books. so that is why i'm very proud and happy that just world books is headquartered here in charlottesville. we have a couple titles coming out. one on food policy and its relationship to the middle east, and another on pakistan. very timely topics. the title is timely books for changing times. and that's plenty from me. i want everybody here and watching on tv at home to go to the web site, www.justworldbooks.com and check out as our new titles come out on a timely basis, thank you. >> don't forget to buy them when you check them out. i'm going to introduce our three
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Mar 12, 2011 9:00pm EST
including rehabilitating the mall of washington. we used to have railroad tracks and industrial buildings now it is cleaned up and say beautiful open area, a place of america's front yard, america's living room. politicians made that happen and i think the important thing here, this is america city. everybody has a stake, everybody comes here and belongs to them and the book tells them how it came about. >> there is anomalies, the site where the lincoln conspirators were wrong, the famous photograph is now a tennis court. the place in which garfield was shot back to the williams college reunion was in front of the building on the wall. where it says this is where the president was shot. part of it is discovering the layered history of the city and going back to amazing things of the civil war, and a part of washington were abraham lincoln, there is a battle, the confederate troops approach and abraham lincoln stands up and they shoot at him and they say you fool. one of the problems with the battle of fort stevens that they had to keep the citizens back from getting killed. what
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Mar 19, 2011 10:00am EDT
eyes,. it's with us? gardens. may it be remembered. for now on the secret of remain unspoken. have pity on those who must keep secrets. me that you remembered. without any further ado, please join me in the welcoming hamid dabashi. [inaudible conversations] >> thank you. good evening, everyone. before i even start up like to apologize for having to run out immediately after my short remarks because of some scheduling conflicts i have had to call myself tonight. i actually have to be in asia were we are celebrating the cinema of to fantastic iranians have just been sentenced to six years in jail for making films. we are celebrating their some of and taken the occasion to shed light on other it was none political prisoners and union activists, students write this, women's rights activists and so forth. i do apologize. i am actually delighted that my good friend and colleague and comrades, danny postel and nader hashemi are coeditors of this brilliant and pioneering book in which allied to have been included by the gracious attention to my work. not only a guide into what has happened
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Mar 20, 2011 10:00pm EDT
and proposals. thank you very much for being with us and for watching. .. and the prospects for success. it was held at columbia university in new york city. it's just under two hours. >> thanks so much for coming to this evenings panel discussion with several of the contributors to the new anthology, "the people reloaded." the green movement in the struggle for iran's future, which i had the honor code again with my friend and comrade, nader hashemi from whom you'll be hearing shortly. first, i'd like to thank the department of middle eastern, south asian and african studies here at columbia university for sponsoring this event today. i'd also like to thank the middle east institute of columbia university and the columbia university graduate school of journalism for cosponsoring. finally, and that you think the publisher of the book. and in particular, i would like to express my appreciation to my friend, hamid dabashi, who made all the arrangements for tonight's discussion possible. when this book was published, seems like a long time ago. the book was published at the beginni
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Mar 13, 2011 10:00pm EDT
it's a reminder for all of us that we need to be humble about what we cannot and can be achieved here. so this is the background, these stories, the words that can't be uttered, the words that can be whispered in the big sea. the question was, what were the stories? and one thread that came very early on is that i knew somewhere in the story would have to be the story of one of the most remarkable women in recent intellectual history and that is very lasker, near loughborough among many other things directed her philanthropic energies. she was unusual woman for a time, an entrepreneur, a person who then directed an enormous amount of philanthropic energy toward solving, as she put it, transforming the geography and the landscape and if there is one sort of central characters spinning to the story it would be very lasker. and it very quickly -- i found sidney farber who begins the book, a scientific collaborator. and it's very lasker gave political legitimacy, she provided the scientific legitimacy for the war on cancer. the book begins with sidney farber. sidney farber was a path
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Mar 19, 2011 2:45pm EDT
narratives that we use to convince ourselves of things that appear not to be true actually are. little did i know at the time exactly how much that was this as a project that initially started as a hopeful magazine story. i could not interest any magazine editor in writing it. it's actually less rare than you think. you can't sell a magazine article, but you can read a book. we don't want to read 5,000 words, but 130,000 words, great. so i ended up writing, this is a little bit less than half of the book that i ended up writing. which is good. it definitely should not have been bike it was, but i'm just saying that as an illustration of the way in which i felt like this one issue permeated through of the things that we are dealing with as a society and culture. it's also the reason why neither the word autism or vaccine appears in the title, which i had some spirited debates with my publisher. get scene, i believe that you should see what they are about. i kept saying, well, it is not just about that. we don't want to give people the impression that it is about this one specifi
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Mar 12, 2011 12:00pm EST
second generation memoir," she reconstructs the complex story of her family's history that helps us understand the influence of european jewish life in the nineteenth and twentyth century. in "a long way gone: memoirs of a boy soldier" ishmael beah tel story of his life in the civil war in serbia and in the 1990s. he served as a powerful spokesperson for child soldiers almost from the moment of his rehabilitation. he worked with unicef on global use and poverty issues. chiquis barron was born in mexico and immigrated to arizona at the age of 5. a graduate of the you of a she has worked in behavioral and mental research since 1998. her novel focuses on the unique geographical political and cultural dynamics of growing up in the crux of two influential countries. her blonde stands at the top of the top 113 latino blood. now we will hear from governor castro. >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i am honored to be here this morning. i am lucky to make it. i live in arizona. 75 yards from the mexican border. i was afraid they might turn me upside down asking me for papers, whether i w
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Mar 5, 2011 12:48pm EST
knowledge. he does it in the most peculiar way. he does this by inviting us to attend almost exclusively to the way in which we use language. his logic, his approach to the study of knowledge is to present us with a study of language and of how we acquire it, how we deploy it and particularly the taste we show human life and using this language in the company of others and in social context. what a strange thing to do to what has been the study of logic and metaphysics? in his moral philosophy, he builds on this. he talks about the way in which we acquire sentiments of morality, just this, political obligation, particularly aesthetics. and he does two things, which are interesting. the first is the very quietly distances about his notion that there is a moral sense. no one can doubt we have the moral sensibility, but is it hogwild and the human personality. smith saw no reason to believe that. we have been acquired sensibility. how do we do with? essentially through sympathy with others. sympathetic relationships which are fostered and shaped by language. that is where sensib
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Mar 20, 2011 1:00pm EDT
. >> first like to day thank you to fred for organizing this, and to frank for lending us this lovely space. it's nice to be back in the burrow of my birth. the burey of my parents' birth, and nice to see my brother who lives here as well, a retired police sargeant, -- sergeant and a graduate of st. francis. nice to see michael. so let's get going. i think the best way to start, i'd like to take you all back on a little trip in time. we're heading back to the year 1972. some analogous period to today. the u.s. was involved in a divisive and somewhat disappointing military intervention overseas and there was polar rising cull tower war -- culture war at home, himmize versus hard hatts or hard hat versus hippies, in september 1972, national review published an article about the times with the headlines, is it true what they say about the times? it was cowritten by john outen jerry and patrick mains, one a former reporter at the new york world telegram, the other, the assistant at national review. at that time spiro agnew was talking about the nattering anyway bobs of negativism. richard nixon
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Mar 20, 2011 5:15pm EDT
more, but enough to get us up and running and it's been a great sponsorship. >> david stewart is president of the washington independent review of books.com is the website. >> you are watching booktv on c-span 2, 48 hours of nonfiction authors and books every weekend. >> and "the bee eater," said to examine school chancellor michelle rhee and her three-year effort to reform the school system. this event is 40 minutes. >> the question that i get asked most about this book is how did i get started on this? it's kind of an interesting story because i finished the book and i knew if i was going to write another book, that it shouldn't be another issue. people love issue books, but they don't actually buy an issue book. [laughter] i wanted to write one that a reason to turn the page. my wife and i were out biking and all of a sudden i realized i ended up asking michelle to cooperate in some way the book. she eventually -- she give me some access here -- enough obviously to the book, which is great. everyone also asked me what my favorite michelle story is. the problem -- there's anoth
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Mar 5, 2011 8:00am EST
who else was there with you. who else could tell me about the store there and start to use rebuild pieces of the platoon that scattered over time. if the guy so gotten arrested or guys who'd gotten out of the army and gone home and tried to rebuild the story. i thought it was an important story both for my city and for the army, and ultimately for all of us to learn and what had happened with the soldiers at fort carson had created a string of murders. i'm not talking a couple of murders. i'm talking within this brigade, and i quickly learned after tracking and soldiers that it was one combat brigade that all this was happening in. within this brigade there was one particular battalion and i was all the cards came out of that. that's about 500 soldiers. entity tag with the murder rate, it wasn't one or two bad apples. the murder rate of about 100 times the national average. and if you adjust it and you say look, it's all young men, they are all young, all male. that's highest risk of violent crime of any section of population. if you adjust it for that, it was just 20 times greater
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Mar 19, 2011 1:00pm EDT
out for michelle rhee consider what happened? seaside people like us are just so desperate to make a dent in some kind of improvement in the urban school district. so it is going to have incremental sturbridge not. he offered proof in this avalanche that came to michelle as she stepped down. so i think kevin is straight. these reforms are going to be tried again and not just michelle spurgeon. so not going to pass it to michelle linnaeus be by agreeing to talk with her relations with the press, probably heard the favorite topic. considering this is organized by each initial advisory association can she played along a circuit court. >> my relations with the press. i think my relationship with the press was complicated. let me say on the first side that a lot of very good things happened because of the press attention that week i, with the efforts we were putting forests. i was really surprised, to tell you the truth, when i started the job that there was so much interest in literary doing. at first i would often go out to dinner with richard and sean and talk about how strange it was.
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Mar 13, 2011 8:00am EDT
line from sam to kathryn, and just let us know what's got your attention now,iy what's in your future, what are you working on? is you can't sit still, i imagine. ..ure in l.a., marijuana stories and humbled and doing something i would like to have you all check out my web site, sam quinones.com. does storytelling called true your -- tell your true tale. go to my web site sam quinones.com. i've got numerous stories up there now and i'm looking for many more. i don't pay anything but i do edit and sometimes that is more important. that is what i'm working on now and hoping to do a be a book as well on the issues of kidnapping and home invasion and robberies in phoenix. >> one, continuing my journalism. i have a story coming out this week about kind of a historical look at the great copper mine strike in arizona in 1983, which would be very useful for us to review right now f, now that we have a new copper mine trying to come in to arizona and what happened there and what happened to those people. as far as my reporting on immigration, i'm really interested in looking at the detention c
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Mar 5, 2011 12:00pm EST
microphone by using the word p, like peter picks a pumpkin. [talking over each other] >> i was talking to him. honestly, this has been an unbelievable journey and an illuminating one. i am learning from our people and others and working alongside the communities which is why i wanted to write this book which is a mystifying experience. conceptually, you know that kids in low-income communities have the full potential to have an excellent education but now we know really it is within our reach to do this and there's nothing magic about it. there's nothing out of reach but also nothing easy about it. it takes the same discipline and leadership that it takes to attain outcomes in any other thinking. that is why in this end the question is do people believe this is a crisis? if we do then we need to approach it the same way we would any great crisis that we know we can solve and that is what i fear we are not doing. >> how many kids do we have at the moment? how many thousand applicants? >> 47,000. it defense on federal funding but also 5300. >> so you are selective at this point. >> i don't view
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Mar 13, 2011 10:00am EDT
get in the book -- and us a dasity of hope i'm not going to concentrate on it tonight. you might say to yourself don't politicians all have ghostwriters most of them do. it's an accepted to camouflage in washington as hair dye. everyone does it. except for barack obama. in july of 2008, he was speaking to a convention of school teachers if virginia and you can see this on youtube. he says i've written two books. and they all applaud and he goes a wink and a nod, i actually wrote them myself. and now they laugh because they think it's a joke. you see republicans can't do it and they're not smart enough to write their own books so this becomes the foundational myth of his genius. not only did he write dreams for my father and the audacity of hope but he wrote them himself without help. in this regard, barack obama was the last and greatest in a line of very, very smart scary smart democratic political figures. now, going back a ways just think about this progression. in the '50s we had add lay steven -- adlai stevenson, do you remember his nickname. the nickname because he was so smart
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Mar 5, 2011 9:00am EST
helped me as a television broadcaster. learning how to use and project your voice and not being afraid to get in front of people. i joined the newspaper and they gave me a column called decision news. they were called divisions. my job was to go around to all the homerooms and interview people about what was going on. [talking over each other] >> kind of a gossip column who won the spelling bee or the science fair. i enjoyed so much having access to go around these rooms and talk to the teachers and the students before anybody else knew them and then to write them up and see my byline. oh my goodness! [talking over each other] >> it is kind of a heady experience. >> so you make the decision -- [talking over each other] >> i loved it. [talking over each other] >> people coming up to me to tell me information. i loved the serious child who read a lot. it all worked. to reading, writing, access, being able to ask questions and get answers, just wonderful. just what i wanted to. do i know anybody black? did i know anybody -- white woman that was a reporter or any woman? all i knew was lois
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Mar 20, 2011 12:00am EDT
publisher want -- use said her name wasn't always associated with the books. she didn't want her name on the book. but from commercial standpoint, did the publisher want her name on the book? >> i think they would have liked her name on the look but they didn't press her, they didn't press her on that and i didn't come across anybody asking her on the publisher's part, on the publisher's point of view to actually do it. oftentimes, her authors would say jackie can i please acknowledge you at least? because she did contribute to the book itself. and oftentimes, they said please, don't put me in the acknowledgement. peter, for example, want to put in the three golden keys, this book which was a profitable book actually a children's book about prague, he wanted her in the college and she said no, but he drew a little picture of his daughter in a cat costume same thing he for the dream, j.o.. so she's there. [laughter] >> one more question. >> actually, there's one right there. did you get cooperation or discussion with family members? >> the head of doubleday -- the head of doubleday was
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Mar 19, 2011 1:45pm EDT
stories, putting up poles and the narrative. narrative inquiry can be useful corrective to all of this. obama, truth is the best corrective. the mind works in contradiction and honesty requires the writer to reveal disputes with herself on the page. obama, i suspect that we can't pretend these contradictions of our situations don't exist. all we can do is choose. the reason must actually see the struggle, not by a tourist, but by pilgrim. all in all it was an intellectual journey that i imagined for myself complete with maps and west point and strict itinerary. narrative writers strive for personal signature but must be aware of the struggle for honesty being constant. obama, i was engaged in a fiscal interior struggle. someone -- by the way, this is the only postmodern book that obama wrote. it shows up and nothing else he ever broke except for grams of my father. not a word of it in any of the article seabrook otherwise. these two authors also dabble in advanced postmodern slang. the grooves into which they have fallen, the poses that they assume, and even the stitched together
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